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Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Another Afternoon at Fontainebleau State Park (Updated)

One of dozens of American coots.

One of at least dozens of red-winged blackbirds.

Pied-billed grebe (the 1st I've ever seen.)

Caspian tern (who later caught a fish.)

Great egrets.

One of two nutrias, invasive marsh-destroyers of the South.

The obligatory sunsets...


(Update, May 2009; Published in the book of the Generation Fig Tree '09 art show.)

23 comments:

Charles Gramlich said...

That last one could be a cover for a gothic novel.

ivan@creativewriting.ca said...

Wnderful photos.

American Coot?

Oh, I'm so tempted.

But I'm a Canadian coot.

bernie kasper said...

Beautiful shots Lana, I will be getting out soon, hopefully so will the wildflowers !!

Travis Erwin said...

I love that last shot. Stunning.

laughingwolf said...

ab fab, lana... while i sit here at -8C :(

Donnetta Lee said...

Love the animals but especially love the sunset. How do you capture these moments?? Good job. D

Michelle (artscapes) said...

Those last two are incredible!

Angie said...

Gorgeous sunsets, as always. :)

And so that's a coot?? [squint] I'd heard the "You old coot!" expression before, but I never knew what a coot was. :) I always just assumed it was something mammalian, for no particular reason.

Angie

Tabib said...

Lovely in flight shoots and sunset too.

earthtoholly said...

All beautiful shots, Lana. I especially love your tern in flight and those sunsets. They are gorgeous!

Chrissy said...

Great shots Lana:-) Some things are so similar and some things are so different. Our coots look pretty much the same, our black birds are all black with a yellow beak and wonderful birdsong. I have never seen a grebe like that one although we do have some different types. The tern in flight is superb, I find it hard to capture birds in flight close in. I have never heard of a nutria, a very odd looking thing, LOL. The sunset is beautiful, thanks for sharing, I swear I learn more from blogs than I ever did at school, LOL

Lana Gramlich said...

Charles; I guess you need to write a gothic novel then. ;)

Ivan; A coot's a coot, wherever you go, I think. I'm slowly becoming a crotchety coot, myself.

Bernie; Thank you. Isn't Spring wonderful? We've actually already had some wildflowers blooming here for a few weeks now. The azalea bushes our town's noted for also started blooming a little while back now. Ah, colors!

Travis E.; Thank you! BTW, don't forget to send me your new snail mail address...

Laughingwolf; My sympathies. I hope to never experience -8C (or worse,) again. Ever.

Donnetta; Thank you. :) I may do a post about sunsets in the near future, so I'll refrain from answering that question here, but stay tuned.

Michelle; Thanks. :) I give full credit to nature for all of these shots. All I did was point a camera & push a button.

Angie; Thank you. I don't know if it's accurate, but according to this site; "The coot is an unloved and unlovely aquatic bird that shares habitat and migration patterns with ducks. Among duck hunters, the coot is considered a pest and a distraction. It is also a truly ugly and awkward bird, and virtually inedible to most people. So to call someone an 'old coot' is to label them as a pest, unattractive, sort of an unwelcome hanger-on. Also, the coot is reluctant to fly, and when it does, it makes a great commotion in its attempt to get airborne, running across the water and flapping frantically. "Old coot" may also, therefore, suggest an old man who is slow to rise and reluctant to move."
They may be considered pests, but I love them (& they're certainly a lot better than nutrias!)

Tabib & Holly; Thank you kindly. :)

Chrissy; Thanks. I have the same problems photographing birds in flight. Trust me when I say the tern was a rare one in at least 10 that came out relatively clearly. I have to play w/the settings on my camera more than I do.
Nutrias are large, South American rodents that some idiots thought would make them a lot of money (in the fur trade.) The idiots were proven wrong & released the animals, which have been wreaking havoc ever since (the link provided gives all kinds of details, of course.) They're pretty much open season all the time around here. I think there might even be a $5 bounty on them.

Michelle's Spell said...

Hey lovely Lana,

I love all the pictures, but especially the last one! It's incredible. I agree with Charles -- it would make a hell of a book cover. So beautiful and haunting.

YogaforCynics said...

Love the nutria, even if it does destroy marshes, and really love that photo at the bottom..."obligatory" only because it's so good...

Bird said...

I am also loving the Lovecraftian bottom sunset picture, WOW! And the Nutria has such a weird name, suggests it would be good eating but I'm betting anything that it's not... poor swamp destroyers. We have a similar problem here with mink, well similar in the sense that they were introduced by fur ranchers *shudder*. They don't destroy habitat as such but they do destroy wildlife, in large quantities.

Doson said...

Wow.. the last photo is wonderful & scary too... Its like a HORROR thing

Lisa said...

Absolutely stunning photos, Lana! You must have the most beautiful sunsets in the world where you are!

Larry said...

I don't care what they say-I think the coot is cute.Not as nice as though sunsets though-stunning color!

Lana Gramlich said...

Michelle; Thank you kindly!

Dr. Jay; You're too kind (& I'll do my best w/the nutria, although I can't make promises.)

Bird; Oooh, yes. Mink can be devastating in their own way. :(

Skippy; Thank you!

Lisa; Thanks. :) It's not the area, I think, so much as it's recognizing the signs of a potentially great sunset (which I'll probably be posting on soon.)

Larry; Thank you. I like the coots, too. Particularly the way they bob underwater for marsh weeds & pop back up. So cute!

dotartdude said...

Lana:

I love the dramatic last photo.

Mo : )

Lana Gramlich said...

Mo; I actually got that one accidentally, when we left the marsh area before the sunset's peak colors. It was a fortunate mistake, I think. :)

Barbara Martin said...

Thanks for the background on the Nutria, Lana. Interesting critters.

Lana Gramlich said...

Barbara; There's a lot more info on the net about them, of course, including the extensive damage they cause to S. Louisiana's wetlands. Between nutria, the loss of 98% of the US's longleaf pine forests & killer bees (which reached our area a while ago now,) I really wish humans would just start leaving such things alone, already. Unfortunately I'm wise enough not to hold my breath... <:(

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